Main | What is Shinjin? Essay by Reverend Professor Toshikawasu Arai »
Wednesday
Sep302015

Jinen and Shizen, 自然, by Reverend Professor Toshikawasu Arai

Reverend Professor Toshikawasu Arai visited Salinas on August 9, 2015 and gave a lecture at Salinas' first Furutani Memorial Lecture series.

Jinen and Shizen, 自然

When I gave a Dharma lecture at the Buddhist Temple of Salinas, CA, I failed to communicate with the lady who asked about the difference between “jinen” and “shizen.” She was a local resident of Japanese ancestry and was puzzled by the word “jinen” that I used in explaining the working of Amida Buddha. When I wrote the Chinese letters for jinen on the board, she read it confidently “shizen.” There was a language problem—I was not able to completely switch to Japanese at that time because some participants in the lecture were obviously of non-Japanese origin. In retrospect, I should have explained it in Japanese thoroughly and then repeated my explanation in English afterwards. In any case, the following is my answer.

Both “jinen” and “shizen” are expressed with the same Chinese letters 自然. However, “shizen” means what we call nature—a state of being on the earth and in the universe before any human intervention—with trees, grass, rocks, rivers, ocean, mountains, winds, storms, stars, galaxies, and so on. Actually humans are part of nature, but we tend to regard nature as a totality of objects for our exploitation. In fact, we would have to live like apes and monkeys if we wanted to live in complete harmony with nature. In this sense, humans and nature are in a state of conflict.

On the other hand, “jinen” was originally a Taoist word borrowed by Buddhists in China. In Taoism, it meant “spontaneously becoming so.” When Buddhists borrowed it, it came to mean the Buddha’s working to guide sentient beings to the Buddha path. Jinen surpasses all human calculations and efforts and is beyond human cognizance. Shinran made it even clearer by interpreting it to mean “causing us to become so.” In other words, it is another expression of “tariki,” or “the power that causes us to walk the Buddha path before we are aware of it.” Jinen is, therefore, synonymous with the power of the Primal Vow. “Shizen,” or nature, can exist without the existence of humans, or without “me,” but “jinen” is used by a person who has awakened to the working of the Primal Vow on him that has guided him/her to the Buddha path without his/her awareness,. In a plainer expression, it can be said, “Previously, I lived without the knowledge of the Dharma and without any reverence to the Buddha. I even looked down upon priests for their socially unproductive lives. Now I realize the Buddha had already known myself in such a state and with many different means has guided me to awaken to the Buddha’s Primal Vow. How grateful I am for the Buddha’s benevolence.”

「じねん」と「しぜん」、自然

私が8月9日にカリフォルニア州サリーナスで仏教講話をしたとき、私が「じねん」という言葉を使ったので、日系の女性にその漢字を書くようにと言われました。それで「自然」と書くと、彼女はそれを「しぜん」と読んで、「じねん」という読み方を受け容れようとはしませんでした。そこで「じねん」と「しぜん」の違いについて説明しようとしたのですが、一つには、英語で説明していたこともあり、もう一つには、おそらく「しぜん」という読み方がその方には定着していて、「じねん」を説明しようとしても受け付けてくださらなかったのだと思います。それでその違いを今ご説明しようと思います。

上に述べたように、「じねん」も「しぜん」も同じ漢字「自然」を使います。一般に使われている読み方は「しぜん」の方です。「しぜん」とは、私たち人類の手が入る前の、地球上、さらには宇宙の中の、存在の状態です。すなわち草木・岩・川・海・山・風・嵐・星・星雲などです。実際には人類も「しぜん」の一分ですが、私たち、特に現代人は、「しぜん」を私たちが生きるために搾取するものの総体と考えているようです。その意味では「しぜん」と人類とは相克関係にあります。

他方「じねん」の方は、もともと中国の道教の用語で、「そのまま」を意味しました。仏教がその語を借りたとき、仏道へ導く仏の働きを意味するようになりました。「じねん」は人間の計算や努力を超越しており、人間の認知能力を超えております。親鸞はさらに進めて、「おのづからしからしむ」という定義をしました。すなわち、「他力」と同じ意味であり、私たちの認識力を超えて私たちを仏道に導く力を指します。つまり本願力と同義語なのです。「しぜん」は人間(私)がおろうとおるまいと存在しますが、「じねん」は、自分の気がつかないうちに仏の働きによって仏道に入らしめられた、という気づきがあって初めて使えます。もう少し簡易な表現で言うと、「自分はもともと仏とも法ともない人間であった。僧侶を社会的に何も生産しない余計な存在だとも思っていた。しかし仏が様々な手段によって私に仏の本願に目覚めさせてくださった。仏の慈悲の働きは何と偉大なことか!」という気づきかあって、初めて「じねん」の意味が分かるのです。